You are viewing reykr

Curiosity and Serendipity [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
reykr

[ userinfo | livejournal userinfo ]
[ archive | journal archive ]

Dying in America is a financial nightmare. [Jan. 6th, 2012|03:44 pm]
ASSSISTED SUICIDE:
Dying in America is a financial nightmare. One penniless relative: 4 days in hospital: $68,000./ Nursing home, $5400 a month, plus haircuts,etc./

Most medical expenses are in the last 6 months of life. Medicare is smart ...to pay 100% for hospice then, instead of hospital. But MDs balk at certifying 'only 6 months to live'.

Medicaid is available--IF you can devote 50 hours of phone-time to find out the rules !

GOP tried to abolish bankruptcy for individuals--NOT of course for corporations! But Dems forced them to allow ch.7 bankruptcy still for people earning less than median pay. But then you have to pay a lawyer !

We face a huge wave of boomers moving into old-age. If only those who desire it would be allowed assisted suicide ! It doesn't shorten life, just cuts short long deaths.

Anyone can commit suicide, unassisted--but it takes some skills, skills often lacked by people near the end.(And any helping relative goes to prison!) As things are, you have to decide on suicide at the first suspicion, say of Alzheimers. With assisted suicide, you could wait till you're sure.

Suicide-options saves people in their 70s (like myself) from blight of remembering horrible situation of relatives in late 80s.
-----------------
The Catholic bishops will scream, of course, as will the formidable nursing-home and hospital lobbies, wealthy allies of the bishops. But the health-insurers should enlist on the side of permission--as should the government, faced with staggering medicare/medicaid deficits.

We once faced staggering embalming bills; now even the Catholic bishops accept sensible cremation. I predict that within ten years, with necessary precautions (as now hold in Oregon) assisted suicide will be an accepted institution everywhere.
---------------
MY OWN PLANS: When I know I face Alzheimers or incurable cancer--then, after goodbyes to friends and relatives, I'm off to Vienna, where I will OD on luscious pastries and great beer--
then, if still necessary, into the Blue Danube.
LinkLeave a comment

(no subject) [Oct. 1st, 2011|09:26 pm]
Around 1957, shortly after the end of the Korean War, I decide to lead a celibate life. I'd read about the suffering that our POWs had endured in Chinese prison camps. Even, after they returned, they were were severely criticized by politicians and prosecuted as "traitors" by our own government.

In order to avoid having any descendants who would have to endure such stuff, by getting drafted into our nation's "perpetual war" army, I decided to avoid having any descendants, at all. It was the best decision I ever made.

The Fifth Army black-listed me, in June, 1961, by suspending the security clearance that allowed me to work at the Chamberlain Company, in Waterloo. That caused me to suspect the worst, namely of being sent to prison. In those lousy days, I also had no trustworthy person in which to confide. I was slowly going out of my mind.

At that time, a young woman in the office began pursuing me, but I had no interest in dangerous, unethical sex with an engaged woman. Her friends began to hate me, and I regarded them as troublemakers.

Two months later a psychiatrist, William Tice, conniving with my supervisor Irving Herman, had me held in Allen Hospital, and tortured with electric shock "treatment," on five different occasions. That drove me out of my mind, somewhat faster. Tice later committed suicide.

Both Irving and my other supervisor John Bergstrom were friendly toward me, and gave me good references, but they were worried about how this might affect their own careers. They were more inclined to believe accounts by glib liars than those of a shy introvert, such as myself, whom the government had already black-listed.

After Chamberlain laid me off, I went to college to get a teaching certificate, and taught in various schools until 1970, including 3 years at a school in Nebraska. During that time, I became interested in B.F. Skinner's "Walden Two" idea, of communes as an alternative to the "Warfare State."
Link1 comment|Leave a comment

Celibacy [Oct. 1st, 2011|09:08 pm]
Around 1957, shortly after the end of the Korean War, I decide to lead a celibate life. I'd read about the suffering that our POWs had endured in Chinese prison camps. Even, after they returned, they were were severely criticized by politicians and prosecuted as "traitors" by our own government.

In order to avoid having any descendants who would have to endure such stuff, by getting drafted into our nation's "perpetual war" army, I decided to avoid having any descendants, at all. It was the best decision I ever made.

The Fifth Army black-listed me, in June, 1961, by suspending the security clearance that allowed me to work at the Chamberlain Company, in Waterloo. That caused me to suspect the worst, namely of being sent to prison. In those lousy days, I also had no trustworthy person in which to confide. I was slowly going out of my mind.

At that time, a young woman in the office began pursuing me, but I had no interest in dangerous, unethical sex with an engaged woman. Her friends began to hate me, and I regarded them as troublemakers.

Two months later a psychiatrist, William Tice, conniving with my supervisor Irving Herman, had me held in Allen Hospital, and tortured with electric shock "treatment," on five different occasions. That drove me out of my mind, somewhat faster.

Both Irving and my other supervisor John Bergstrom were friendly toward me, and gave me good references, but they were worried about how this might affect their own careers. They were more inclined to believe accounts by glib liars than those of a shy introvert, such as myself, whom the government had already black-listed.
LinkLeave a comment

Celibacy [Oct. 1st, 2011|08:29 pm]
Shortly after the end of the Korean War, I decide to lead a celibate life, after reading about the suffering that our POWs had endured in Chinese prison camps. Even, after they returned, they were were severely criticized by politicians and prosecuted as "traitors" by our own government.

In order to avoid having any descendants who would have to endure such stuff, I decided to avoid having any descendants, at all. It was the best decision I ever made.

The Fifth Army black-listed me, in June, 1961, by suspending the security clearance that allowed me to work at the Chamberlain Company, in Waterloo. That caused me to suspect the worst, namely being sent to prison. In those lousy days, I had no trustworthy person in which to confide. I was slowly going out of my mind.

At that time, a young woman in the office began pursuing me, but I had no interest in dangerous, promiscuous sex. Her friends began to hate me, and I regarded them as troublemakers.

Two months later a psychiatrist, William Tice, conniving with my supervisor Irving Herman, had me held in Allen Hospital, and tortured with electric shock "treatment." That drove me out of my mind, somewhat faster.
LinkLeave a comment

Celibacy [Sep. 30th, 2011|03:50 pm]
I decided to lead a celibate life, shortly after the end of the Korean War, after reading about the suffering that our POWs had endured in Chinese prison camps. Then, after they returned, they were were berated by politicians and prosecuted as "traitors" by our own government.

In order to avoid having any descendants who would have to endure such stuff, I decided to avoid having any descendants, at all. It was the best decision I ever made.

I thought that having descendants resulted from mere vanity, which meant nothing to me, in comparison to the danger of causing others to live in this evil world.

The Fifth Army black-listed me, by suspending my security clearance, just before the July 4 holiday in 1961. That caused me to suspect the worst, namely being sent to prison. I had no one in which to confide. Then, in August, a psychiatrist, William Tice, collaborating with Irving Herman, had me held in Allen Hospital, and tortured with electric shock "treatment." That drove me out of my mind.
LinkLeave a comment

About.com Kidney Failure [Sep. 29th, 2011|01:45 pm]
.SearchDeath and DyingHospice 101Tips & MoreEnd-of-Life.SharePrint .Apply now to guide this site

Discuss in our forum
What is it Like to Die of Kidney Failure?
From Angela Morrow, RN, former About.com Guide
Updated April 25, 2010

About.com Health's Disease and Condition content is reviewed by the Medical Review Board

.See More About:dyingthe dying processkidney failure
Sponsored Links
Alkaline Water Benefits
Sign Up to Receive a Free DVD and Book on Alkaline Water Here.
www.LifeIonizers.com/Alkaline-Water

Chronic Kidney Disease
Find Chronic Kidney Disease. A Top Resource For Expert Advice.
healthyweb.com

Natural Kidney Treatment
Natural Kidney Treatment Info. Discover The Knowledge You Need.
healthynow.com
Sponsored Links
Natural Heal for Kidney
MD-developed herbal support for Proteinuria, Glomerulonephritis
www.goutwell.com

Kidney Cancer Symptoms
Learn About Kidney Cancer Symptoms. Your Guide To A Healthy Lifestyle!
dailybody.com
Question: What is it Like to Die of Kidney Failure?
If you have end stage renal disease, you may be wondering what it is like to die of kidney failure. Many people find it helpful to know what they can expect as they journey through the dying process. Whether you've suffered acute kidney failure in conjunction with another serious illness and have decided not to start dialysis, or if you have end-stage renal disease and have decided to discontinue dialysis, here is what you can expect going forward.

Answer:
Death from kidney failure is generally considered a gentle death. In fact, many physicians and nurses would choose to die of kidney disease rather than any other illness. Most symptoms of kidney failure can be easily managed or suppressed and pain is rarely a problem.

Physical Symptoms of Kidney Failure
The kidneys filter waste from the bloodstream and regulate the amount of water contained within the blood. When the kidneys fail to do their job, the waste accumulates in the body. This build up of waste may cause several symptoms.

Energy Level: The first thing you may notice is a loss of energy. You may become more sleepy or lethargic. Your sleeping patterns may change; you might sleep more during the day or have difficulty sleeping at night. As things progress, you will sleep more and more and eventually lose consciousness altogether.

Mental Changes: You might notice mild confusion early on that may progress to disorientation, anxiety, or delirium. Any discomfort from these mental changes can usually be easily managed with gentle reassurance from loved ones and health care professionals and the use of medications, if needed.

Muscle Changes: As minerals build up in the blood, you may notice muscle twitching, tremors, or even seizures. Medications can be given to prevent seizures and treat them if they occur. Gentle massage can relieve discomfort caused by muscle twitching or spasms.

Skin Changes: A build up of a chemical called urea in the blood may cause your skin to itch. You may even develop a fine white powder on your skin. Itching can usually be controlled with topical creams or antihistamines such as Benedryl.

Appetite and Weight Changes: As with any serious illness, your appetite will decrease and may cease altogether. There is no need to force yourself to eat if your body doesn't feel like it. Doing so may only make you feel worse. You may lose weight as your appetite wanes or you might gain weight as your body retains extra fluid. If you are not producing much urine but still drinking fluids, you might notice your feet, legs, abdomen, and other areas of your body swell with excess fluid.

Changes in Urination: You may pass little or no urine at all. If this is the case for you, limiting the amount of fluid you drink may improve your comfort by decreasing the amount of excess fluid in your body. As mentioned above, excess fluid will lead to swelling of the feet, legs, abdomen, and other areas of the body. The fluid may congest the lungs, making breathing difficult, and strain the heart. If you are not producing any urine, death will usually occur quite soon, usually within one to two weeks. If, however, you are still producing some urine, you could live much longer.

Breathing Changes: The build up of acids in the blood may cause changes in breathing. You may breath faster and more shallow. This breathing is generally not uncomfortable. If fluid has accumulated in the lungs, you may have shortness of breath, also known as dyspnea. There are things you can do to ease shortness of breath like sitting upright, using oxygen and a fan directed at your face, and taking medications such as morphine.

More tips to help manage dyspnea

If you are at home, it's important to have medications on hand to treat symptoms that may occur. A comfort kit of medications can be kept on hand "just in case". Whether you are at home or in a health care facility, a knowledgeable and compassionate hospice team can help you manage any symptoms that arise while helping you and loved ones prepare for death. With your symptoms well managed by professionals, you can focus on what is most important to you during this time.

Death is rarely a welcome guest but death from kidney failure may be the most gentle and comfortable death any of us could ask for. If you have further questions about what to expect during your particular illness, speak with your kidney specialist or hospice physician.

More on Kidney Failure
•Making the Decisions to Stop Dialysisabou
•End-Stage Renal Disease
•Symptom Checker: Kidney Failure
The Dying Process
•The Dying Process: A Journey
•DABDA: The 5 Stages of Coping With Death
•Anticipatory Grief
Caring for the Dying
•Acts of Love: Caring for a Dying Loved One
•Interacting with the Dying
•Nearing Death Awareness: Special Knowledge Death is Near
Related Articles
•Kidney Failure in Dogs and Cats - Signs of Kidney Failure in Dogs and Cats
•Canine and Feline Kidney Failure - Monitoring and Diagnosing Canine and Fel...
•Kidney Failure in Dogs and Cats - Causes of Kidney Failure in Dogs and Cats
•Chronic Canine and Feline Renal Failure - Treating Chronic Canine and Felin...
•High Blood Pressure and Kidney Failure - The Link Between High Blood Pressu...


Death and Dying Ads
•Kidney Failure Symptoms
•Dog Symptoms
•Kidney Disease
•Urine Infection Symptoms
•Heart Disease Symptoms
LinkLeave a comment

Kidney failure, gentle death. [Sep. 29th, 2011|01:38 pm]
http://dying.about.com/od/thedyingprocess/f/dying_of_kidney_failure.htm
LinkLeave a comment

Alzheimer's disease results in death? Big deal. [Aug. 28th, 2011|06:07 pm]
Articles about Alzheimer's Disease state that it's the fifth-leading cause of death. Big deal. First, the people who have it are at, or close to, an age when people generally die of something. Second, I think death would be the best thing that might happen, if I had Alzheimer's, myself.

I'm age 79, and have such dizziness, that it's sometimes hard to keep from falling over. My mother fell and broke her hip at age 71, and her sister did the same thing, at age 87. Death is surely preferable to intermimable suffering, especially if it's mindless, as dementia is.

My mother had arthritis, but I don't know if her sister did. They both existed for many years, in nursing homes.

If I remember right, a "Courier" story about the death of King George V mentioned that his physician had given him a form of euthanasia. He was the head if the Anglican Church. The law can be merciful to the ruling class, but the lives of us peons are declared "sacred," which means, "the property of the government."
LinkLeave a comment

(no subject) [Aug. 6th, 2011|09:55 pm]
The July 30 article, about Melody Judge being a minister of the Universal Life Church, was interesting. The August 6 comments about it, by Phil and Julie Paladino, were interesting, too.

I, also, am a minister of that Universal Life Church. At Thanksgiving time in 1972, I happened to be in central California, and stopped at Modesto, to visit the late Kirby Hensley at his church. Quite a few people were there for a Thanksgiving dinner, and just before we left, he gave each of us his "Doctor of Divinity" degree, which at that time usually cost twenty dollars .

Although I call myself "just a make-believe minister," I have equal standing with a real one under the U.S. Constitution, which says, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof."

The Paladinos criticize Hensley's church for not being devout enough. However, Hensley, who had been a Baptist minister before establishing the Universal Life Church, had compared the exclusiveness of some, presumably pious, religious groups to the uselessness of the "barren fig tree" of the Gospels.
LinkLeave a comment

Sarah Townsend suicide [Jul. 26th, 2011|07:03 pm]
According to the online Courier July 26, Sarah Townsend, an 18-year-old high school student of Florence NJ, committed suicide by drowning, and cocaine was found in her body. Frankly, since drowning is apparently a very painful death I'd surely prefer to have some such pain-killer in my system, if I died that way.

I wonder what was her reason for dying. Henry David Thoreau, who said, "Most men lead lives of quiet desperation," should have included women, in that statement, too.
LinkLeave a comment

navigation
[ viewing | 10 entries back ]
[ go | earlier/later ]